DJ/CO

DJ/CO

The Anthropology of Work

Innovation

Leadership For Innovation

Last week I wrote a piece expressing my frustration with the scale of excuse-making that prevails across the corporate landscape.  As I indicated, this is not just my frustration, but also that of leading consultants and business school professors.  However, as I will set out in 2014 to demonstrate with[…]

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I Can’t Prove It

Several years ago, at the Transform Innovation Summit at the Mayo Clinic, Roger Martin gave a moving talk about what kills and what drives innovation.  In the talk, which he called a rant, he suggested that the two words- prove and it- when used together, are innovation killers.  He provided[…]

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The Lonely Frontier

It is cliche to say, but change is never easy.  The kinds of organizational changes I am advocating in my new book- The Fifth Age of Work– are far from easy.  The comfort of familiarity and tradition should never be underestimated.  Established tradition and known routines make the world easier[…]

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Once Upon a Twitter

At SXSW in 2010 Umair Haque interviewed (former) Twitter CEO Evan Williams.  Among other things, the two talked about Twitter’s future and what might be the most useful and important applications of Twitter’s technology.  Despite the profound awkwardness of Hague’s interview, some interesting content did come out of the discussion.[…]

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Apple of My Eye

Well, Carl Icahn is at it again.  He has now turned his activist-investor energy towards Apple.  He is demanding that the company buy back $150 billion in stock, as a sign of strength and balls to investors and to the world.  Investors like Icahn claim that such strategies of financial[…]

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After LinkedIn

While I’ve not conducted scientific research on the subject, I’m more or less sure that LinkedIn is a Baby Boomer thing.  Maybe Gen X too, but not Gen Y or Gen C. Resumes.  Networking.  Career “connections” (vs. social connections). “I used to be the Sr. VP of Marketing and Sales[…]

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The Architecture of Innovation

In the mid-1970s, architect Christopher Alexander wrote passionately about the patterns of social interaction that are created by built environments.  He called these architectural-human patterns “pattern languages.” Since the publication of his seminal book- The Timeless Way of Building– the theory of pattern languages has been picked up and built[…]

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